Course Offerings

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Fall 2018 Graduate Courses – Rochester/Syracuse

Area A: Biblical Studies
Introduction to Christian Scriptures (Rev. David Tedesche, S.T.L.)

“An introduction to the history and literature of the Christian movement in the first and second centuries with particular attention to the New Testament in regards to literary components, composition facets, theological themes, and interpretive principles.”
Wed., 6-10pm 8/22, 9/5, 9/19, 10/3, 10/17, 10/31, 11/14, 12/5

 

Area C: Theological Studies
Moral and Social Teachings (Rev. Jack Healy, Ph.D.)

“Introduction to the fields of moral theology and Catholic Social Thought: their purpose in the life of the Church; their methods, their problems. The content of the course is a thorough treatment of methodological issues rather than analysis of specific moral or social dilemmas, though specific issues and cases are used for purposes of illustration and assisting students in developing skills of application to practical situations. Among the topics to be addressed: sin and conversion, moral growth and development, sources of moral wisdom, methods of moral decision making, conscience and discernment, and the development of Catholic Social Thought.”

Tues., 6-10pm  9/4, 9/18, 10/2, 10/16, 10/30, 11/13,11/27, 12/11

Worship and Sacraments (Rev. Peter Van Lieshout, S.T.L.)

“An historical, anthropological and theological investigation of Christian worship and sacrament with special attention to the Roman Catholic Sacraments of baptism and Eucharist; historical overview of liturgical practices, texts, and theology from Jewish and scriptural origins to the 20th-century Vatican II reforms; basic principles of liturgical and sacramental theology; and groundwork for interpreting liturgical documents and ritual texts from pastoral practice, multi/inter-cultural concerns, and ecumenical considerations.”

Mon., 6-10pm  8/27, 9/10, 9/24, 10/8, 10/22, 11/5, 11/19, 12/3

Theology of Church and Ministry (Matthew Kuhner, Ph.D.)

“Historical and theological overview of the Christian understanding of church and ministry, with the Second Vatican Council (especially Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes) as a primary point of reference. While the western and Roman Catholic context is central to the presentation, global and ecumenical considerations characterize the treatment of such topics as diversity in the early church(es)’s understanding of its mission, the development of ecclesial structures within their historical and cultural contexts, centralization to the papacy and the magisterium, the church as local/universal, the priesthood of the faithful, ecumenical dialogue, and the origin, function, and evolution of ordained and lay ministries.”

Tues., 6-10pm  8/28, 9/11, 9/25, 10/9, 10/23, 11/6, 11/20, 12/4

Mary, Mother of God (Matthew Kuhner, Ph.D)

“An introduction to Mary, the Mother of God and the Mother of the Church. The course will explore Mary’s historical, and theological significance from a Catholic perspective, providing an overview of her role in scripture, doctrine, and devotion. Particular attention will be given to dogmatic formulations and artistic expressions over the centuries.”

Mon., 6:30-9:30pm   8/27-12/10

 

Area D: Pastoral Ministry
Discernment and Formation for Ministry (Nancy Hawkins, Ph.D; Dcn. David Palma)

“Within the Biblical tradition, God continually speaks to humanity, calling them to the holiness of life. Recognizing the lifelong development of Christian spiritual formation, this course guides the beginning student in the practice and art of spiritual discernment. Based on the great spiritual masters of the Catholic tradition, this course will help those attempting to discern how God calls and to what ministry within the baptized assembly one is called.”

Wed., 6-10pm  8/29, 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 10/24, 11/7, 11/28, 12/12

Spiritual Formation (Nancy Hawkins, Ph.D.)

“This course provides a broad introduction to the ways in which people appropriate the mystery of faith, the process entailed in that appropriation, and overview of the history of that process and the types of experience which have emerged in that history. The students can achieve reflective understanding of their own practice, develop it more consciously and be enabled to appreciate and assist others in this area of ministry.”

Thurs,. 6-10pm  8/30, 9/6, 9/20, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 12/6

Pastoral Care I (Roslyn Karaban, Ph.D.)

“This course is designed as a beginning course in understanding the basic principles and methods of pastoral care. It will focus on a theoretical background and is complemented by actual, practical experiences in pastoral listening as part of dyads and working groups.”

Thurs., 6-10pm  8/23, 9/13, 9/27, 10/11, 10/25, 11/8, 11/29, 12/13

 

Fall 2018 Graduate Courses – Albany

Area A: Biblical Studies
A203 Introduction to Christian Scriptures (Joseph Mali, PhD)

Thursdays 6-9pm | August 30-November 15, November 29

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the New Testament (NT). Students will learn about what kind of literature the NT is, how it was formed, and the different methods we may use to understand it. Topics to be covered include: the political, social, and religious background of the NT, the development of the text and canon of the NT, the Gospels in general, the synoptic problem, major themes and their background, and the NT and our world.

Wed., 6-10pm  8/22, 9/5, 9/19, 10/3, 10/17, 10/31, 11/14, 12/5

A322 Isaiah (Marcus Gigliotti, SSL)

Tuesdays, 6-9pm | August 28-November 20

An in-depth look at the book of Isaiah with special reference to its composition, unity, socio-historical background and key theological perspectives. Focus on key texts.

 

Area C: Theological Studies
C226 Worship and Sacraments (Anthony Barratt, PhD)

Mondays, 6-9pm | August 27, September 10-October 1, October 15– December 4

A historical, theological and liturgical investigation of Christian worship and sacraments with attention to the Roman Catholic sacramental system. A review of rituals, texts, interpretations and pastoral practices from their origins to the post-Modern, post-Vatican Two era. Consideration of the cosmic, ecclesial, feminist, intercultural, ecumenical and phenomenological dimensions of a 21st century understanding of worship and sacraments.

C217 Moral and Social Teachings (Michael Brannigan, PhD)

Wednesdays , 6-9pm | August 29-November 21

Introduction to the fields of moral theology and Catholic Social Thought: their purpose in the life of the Church; their methods, their problems. The content of the course is a thorough treatment of methodological issues rather than analysis of specific moral or social dilemmas, though specific issues and cases are used for purposes of illustration and assisting students in developing skills of applications to practical situations. Among the topics to be addressed: sin and conversion, moral growth and development, sources of moral wisdom, methods of moral decision making, conscience and discernment, and the development of Catholic Social Thought.

C449 Thomas Merton, Spiritual Giant (Katherine Hanley, CSJ, PhD)

Wednesdays 12:15-3pm | August 29-November 21

Pope Francis called Thomas Merton “a man of prayer, a thinker who challenged the certitudes of his time and opened new horizons for souls and for the Church. He was also a man of dialogue, a promoter of peace between peoples and religions.”
Through our own prayer, reading, dialogue and study we will hope to come to know this spiritual giant of our time.